News And Projects

Stony Run

Stony Run Walking Path

The opening of the two bridges that cross the Stony Run Stream created the continuous 3.5 mile path that which was envisioned by neighbors going back to 2002. In 2017 the bridges were completed.

Uncompleted projects include:

  • Planting and caring for new trees on hillside by University Parkway and Linkwood
  • Maintaining the TCNA garden by large bridge on Linkwood
  • Replacing aging benches
  • Raising money for additional plantings and maintenance in the park
The old bridge at Ridgemede across the stream

The Stony Run Bridges - A Little History

On October 7, 2017 the Friends of Stony Run, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks hosted a joyous ribbon- cutting event to celebrate the formal opening of the two new bridges over Stony Run.

Only a few Tuscany–Canterbury residents remember when the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, affectionately known as The Ma & Pa, went out of business in the 1950s. Residents living in communities along the abandoned railroad right of way gradually created a walking path from Remington and Stone Hill to Northern Parkway. Most of the pathway was on City parkland, but in numerous places the informal path either crossed stretches of private property and busy public streets or the Stony Run in a manner that was hazardous for all and impossible for some. This was especially true in Tuscany-Canterbury where the stream runs between Linkwood Road on one side and apartment complexes on the other. For years crossing the stream near Stoneyford Road involved a treacherous leap or balancing on a log.

With a continuous path as a goal, neighborhood volunteers began what became a decades long quest

About 15 years ago TCNA President Peter Molan mused and dreamed about a bridge over the stream near the intersection of Stoneyford and Linkwood Roads. Soon after Kirsten Day Held, who lives on Tuscany Road, formed an organization that worked with the City for several years to build a bridge on the site. At Kirsten’s urging the Department of Recreation and Parks even hired an engineering firm to design a bridge on the site. Several years passed, though, and still no bridge. Next up was TCNA President A.J. O’Brien, who because of his interest in the neighborhood and the Ma and Pa Railroad’s history, wanted to figure out how to consolidate the walking path and the old railroad right of way. A.J. worked with lawyers at the Community Law Center to determine whether or not the right of way still existed after the parking lots of the Linkwood Apartments and The Carlyle were constructed

By this time others became interested in the dream of a continuous path along Stony Run and with the necessity of easing the walk to and from Wyman Park. For three years a small group of Tuscany-Canterbury residents met at Choclatea every Tuesday morning to plot and plan. The group included A.J., Anne Perkins, Sue Talbott, Ralph Kurtz, and Bill Eberhart. Soon they were joined by Sandy Sparks from Charles Village, Matt Greenwood from Remington, landscape designer Matt Fitzsimmons from Hord Koplan Macht and an intern from Greater Homewood. The Choclatea group determined that the first step would be for all the neighborhoods along Stony Run from Northern Parkway to Remington and Stone Hill to agree on an alignment for the walking path. This involved raising money – about $20,000 – to hire a landscape architect to design the path and provide maps to use in discussions with neighborhood leaders. The money was raised from individuals, foundations, and Johns Hopkins University. TCNA contributed $1,000 from its treasury. During the spring and summer of 2012 the Choclatea group held meetings with residents in all the communities along Stony Run and eventually got agreement to the proposed alignment.

Next came the need for construction money and lots of it. Our neighbor, Delegate Maggie McIntosh was/is in a key leadership position in the Maryland House of Delegates and was able to persuade Governor Martin O’Malley and then Secretary of Natural Resources John Griffin to appropriate $1.2 million dollars in two budget years for the Linkwood Road bridges and a number of other projects along the path from Northern Parkway to University Parkway. Construction projects seem to take forever – engineering and landscape design, procurement and bidding contracts, construction and storms meetings with the Rec and Parks folks etc. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke had to come to the rescue numerous times as the bridges neared completion. Finally it all came to a joyous finale on October 7.

Never forget, though, that it happened in great part because of the time, effort and perseverance of volunteers and elected officials from Tuscany Canterbury sticking with it over the years.

The New Bridge

Today, the community and officials celebrate the opening of two new pedestrian bridges that cross Stony Run along Linkwood Road. But first a little history…

When the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, affectionately known as The Ma & Pa, went out of business in the 1950s, residents living in communities along the abandoned railroad right of way gradually created a walking path from Remington and Stone Hill to Northern Parkway. Most of the pathway was on City parkland, but in numerous places the informal path either crossed stretches of private property and busy public streets or the stream in a manner that was hazardous for all and impossible for some.

With a continuous path as the goal, neighborhood volunteers embarked on what became a decade long quest. In 2010, neighborhoods along the stream agreed to an alignment for the path and formed an advocacy group, Friends of Stony Run. Working with Delegates Maggie McIntosh and Sandy Rosenberg, the group secured Program Open Space funds from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Partnering with the City Department of Parks and Recreation, Friends of Stony Run negotiated the purchase of several small parcels of private land, worked out an agreement with the Bolton Hill Synagogue and planned crosswalks over several streets. Construction of the two pedestrian bridges over the stream along Linkwood Road has been the major achievement for creating a continuous walking path.

Work on the Stony Run Walking Path has stimulated activities all along the stream corridor. Two years ago, the Roland Park Community Foundation commissioned a strategic plan to establish strategies and goals for maintenance, preservation, and enhancement of the parkland associated with the stream valley in several neighborhoods abutting the northern part of the stream. This plan will inform the future of the Stony Run and it’s associated parklands for many years to come. Anne Perkins

Special Thank You:

The State of Maryland Department of Natural Resources 

  • Mark J. Belton, Daryl Anthony, John F. Wilson, Steve Carr 

 

The Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks

  • Reginald Moore, William Vondrasek, Valerie McGuire, Jim Fendryk, Frank Lipscomb,  
  • Roni Marsh, Gennady Schwartz 

 

Construction, Site Preparation, Landscaping

  • RK&K, Mahan Rykiel Associates, Allied Contractors, Inc., William T. King, Inc., 
  • Hord Coplan Macht, Inc.  

 

Elected Official

 

  • Mayor Catherine Pugh 
  • Maryland General Assembly 
  • Delegate Maggie McIntosh 
  • Delegate Sandy Rosenberg 
  • City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke 
  • City Councilwoman Sharon Green Middleton 

 

Food and Drink

 

  • Hopkins House, Sam’s Canterbury Café; Hopkins House Deli, Alonso’s, Café Hon 

 

Private sector funding

 

  • Johns Hopkins University, Abell Foundation, Lockhart Vaughan Foundation, 
  • Krieger Foundation, Roland Park Community Foundation

 

Community Groups and Non- profit help…

Tuscany Canterbury Neighborhood Association, Wyman Park Community Association, Friends of Stony Run, Roland Park Civic League, Greater Homewood Community Association/Strong City Baltimore, Boy Scouts of America, TreeBaltimore, Blue Water Baltimore, Wyman Park Dog Fanciers, Herring Run Nursery 

Community Volunteers

Peter Molan, Kirsten Day Held, John Held, A. J. O’Brien, Anne Perkins, Sue Talbott, Ralph Kurtz, Bill Eberhart, Matthew Fitzsimmons, Matt Greenwood, Sandy Sparks, Steve Ziger, Amy Bonitz, Al Copp, Mary Page Michel, Phil Spevak,Trudy Bartel, Tom McGilloway, Craig Huntley, Ray Iturraide, Amy Johanson, Myra Brosius, Tom Gamper, Brion McCarthy, Brian Weeks, Steve Mickletz, Natalia Dricho, Claire Wayner, Erin Goodloe, Megan Griffith, Jane Sundius, Jenny Katz, Elaine Doyle-Gilespie, Martha Holleman, Fred Chalfant, Deborah Callard, Ann Finkbeiner, Alice Nelson, Travers Nelson, , Linda Eberhart, Luke  Ackerman, Roz Mansouri, Matt Stegman and many others 

Photos

Sandy Sparks 

And… Governor Martin O’Malley, Secretary John Griffin, Matt Gallagher, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake