News And Projects

39th Street Traffic Calming

2022: Latest Traffic Calming Plan

The plans call for a four-phase project to incrementally improve safety and extend the high-quality landscaping on this stretch of roadway. There will be three new pairs of raised crosswalks, ADA-compliant ramps and sidewalks, landscaped curb bump outs to reduce crossing distances and slow traffic, and new delivery zones so that delivery trucks can safely park along the curb on both sides of 39th Street. Next step: An MOU for maintenance of landscaping and funding of various elements of the project is being negotiated by various stakeholders along 39th Street.

November 2021

39th Street Improvements Progressing

In the coming years, it will be safer and more pleasant to walk along and across 39th Street in Tuscany-Canterbury. The Broadview Apartments has been working with The Traffic Group, a local engineering and design firm, to draw up plans for additional improvements to 39th Street that would slow traffic, add more visible and protected crosswalks at three mid-block locations, and extend the high-quality median and curbside landscaping along 39th Street between University Parkway and Canterbury Road. Thanks to generous donations from neighborhood residents, TCNA was able to cover its share of the costs of the design work ($1,600) with minimal impact on the TCNA operating budget.

TCNA has had several opportunities to provide input to the project design team as 39th Street improvements have advanced from concept to final design.

Phases 1 and 2 will immediately delineate three mid-block crosswalks with ADA-compliant curb ramps, spaced along 39th Street between University Parkway and Canterbury Road.

Phases 3 and 4 will involve more extensive improvements that will install high-quality, durable landscaping and materials throughout. All three mid-block median crossings will have raised crosswalks across the 39th Street travel lanes and stone pavers across the median, similar to the new patio and seating area in the median near Hopkins Deli. Landscaped curb bump-outs at all crosswalks will be filled with topsoil and sod or plantings where feasible, or they will be filled with attractive and durable cobblestone pavers.

The Traffic Group has been particularly helpful in improving the intersection of 39th Street and Stony Run Lane, reducing the width of the lane and installing a highly visible and well-signed crosswalk. Last but not least, the project will designate curbside loading and unloading zones for delivery trucks so that they can pull out of the roadway more safely pull out without blocking people driving, walking, and biking along 39th Street.

The next step is to send the final proposed design plans to Baltimore City Department of Transportation for review and approval. Property owners along 39th Street and the City are nearing completion on a long-term maintenance agreement and will continue to partner as the project advances into procurement and construction.

TCNA’s Streets Committee will continue to be engaged in the project as it advances to ensure the final implemented project meets the original objectives of making 39th Street a safer and more pleasant place to be, enhancing our community.

2018: Overview of Traffic Calming Plan for 39th st

For several years Tuscany-Canterbury has partnered with the Broadview on a variety of projects to beautify 39th Street and to calm the traffic between Charles Street and University Parkway. The neighborhood approved the overall concept in 2014.

During the first phase, the Broadview, working with TCNA, asked a local landscape architect (Mahan Rykiel) to develop a beautification plan for the median. We also asked a local traffic planning consultant (The Traffic Group) to develop a calming plan for 39th St. between University Parkway and Charles Street.

Originally TCNA wanted to improve the median but could not because of the City’s insurance requirements. The Broadview must maintain a broad range of insurance coverage, and was able to execute an agreement with the City to maintain and improve the median. Over the last couple of years, we completed the first portion of the landscape plan between University Parkway and the median break. The planting helps prevent pedestrians from crossing where they shouldn’t, and replaced very spotty grass with a much heartier, shade-friendly ground cover. Last month we reported that the Broadview is willing to add porous pavers and several tables and chairs in the median between the Hopkins Deli and the Broadview, where the crushed stone is presently in place. TCNA members were given the opportunity to review and hopefully approve this portion of the landscape plan.

The traffic calming plan for 39th St. between University Parkway and Charles St. went through several revisions in response to City and community comments. The revised plan was proposed to the new officials in the City’s Dept. of Transportation.

The Traffic and Parking Committee of TCNA has been renamed and combined with the Greening Committee – now called the Streets and Greens Committee. Chris Whitaker is the chairperson of this committee. As projects come forward, the committee will call meetings to get input from the community and discuss possible solutions. And then find ways to make it happen.

The May 2018 meeting reviewed the proposed median improvements and the latest traffic calming plan to help slow down traffic between the round-a-bout and  A final report was given at the Annual meeting on June 13. For more information: Chris at streetsTCNA@gmail.com.

Broadview_Apt_Approved_MOU_10262015

Fall 2014

Many residents believe that drivers are becoming more familiar with the Roundabout and that it has helped to reduce speeding at the 39th Street & Canterbury Road intersection. However, the Traffic Committee is continuing its effort to have the Department of Traffic do something about speeding on 39th Street between Charles Street  and the Roundabout and the Roundabout and West University Parkway.

An ongoing problem relates to the lack of proper drainage on the northwest “corner” of the Roundabout. The Department of Traffic and DPW have known about this problem for over one year, but nothing has been done to fix the problem. TCNA will continue efforts to get this problem solved before cold weather brings back the problem of ice build-up in the crosswalks at this corner.

Fall 2013

Traffic Circle

Jackie Macmillan , Traffic Chairperson

More than fifty neighborhood residents attended a meeting  on October 30, 2012 with officials of the Baltimore City Department of Transportation (DOT) on July 12, 2012 to discuss their concerns about traffic on 39th Street from University Parkway to Charles Street. The meeting was facilitated by Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke. In attendance were DOT director, Khalil A. Zaied, James Harkness, the acting director of Traffic, planner Mark Brown, and northwest transportation liaison Kohl Fallon.

The meeting was an outgrowth of residents’ concerns about pedestrian and bicyclist safety in the corridor, where speeding auto traffic is exacerbated by blind curves and where drivers are often inattentive to walkers and bikers. Attendees cited recent incidents in which a pedestrian was hit by a car near the entrance to the Broadview and a bicyclist was hit by a car at 39th Street and Canterbury Road.

The meeting also addressed residents’ questions and concerns about the planned traffic circle at 39th and Canterbury. Many people who live in the corridor had not attended the last year’s TCNA meeting at which the circle was proposed by DOT officials and endorsed by TCNA members. The meeting provided an opportunity for residents to ask questions and comment.

By the end of the meeting, there was a general agreement that DOT should proceed with the circle, which the DOT officials assured residents would help in slowing traffic. The officials agreed to conduct a traffic study to determine what additional measures are needed to make the corridor safer. Remedies to be considered include speed humps and a speed camera. The TCNA Traffic and Parking Committee is in the process of preparing paperwork to initiate the study.

The Roundabout at 39th and Canterbury is scheduled to be constructed in late fall, 2012.

Fall 2012

Traffic Circle

Jackie Macmillan , Traffic Chairperson

More than fifty neighborhood residents attended a meeting  on October 30, 2012 with officials of the Baltimore City Department of Transportation (DOT) on July 12, 2012 to discuss their concerns about traffic on 39th Street from University Parkway to Charles Street. The meeting was facilitated by Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke. In attendance were DOT director, Khalil A. Zaied, James Harkness, the acting director of Traffic, planner Mark Brown, and northwest transportation liaison Kohl Fallon.

The meeting was an outgrowth of residents’ concerns about pedestrian and bicyclist safety in the corridor, where speeding auto traffic is exacerbated by blind curves and where drivers are often inattentive to walkers and bikers. Attendees cited recent incidents in which a pedestrian was hit by a car near the entrance to the Broadview and a bicyclist was hit by a car at 39th Street and Canterbury Road.

The meeting also addressed residents’ questions and concerns about the planned traffic circle at 39th and Canterbury. Many people who live in the corridor had not attended the last year’s TCNA meeting at which the circle was proposed by DOT officials and endorsed by TCNA members. The meeting provided an opportunity for residents to ask questions and comment.

By the end of the meeting, there was a general agreement that DOT should proceed with the circle, which the DOT officials assured residents would help in slowing traffic. The officials agreed to conduct a traffic study to determine what additional measures are needed to make the corridor safer. Remedies to be considered include speed humps and a speed camera. The TCNA Traffic and Parking Committee is in the process of preparing paperwork to initiate the study.

The Roundabout at 39th and Canterbury is scheduled to be constructed in late fall, 2012.

Fall 2011

Reaching Out to the City for Help with the 39th Street Median

Most of us would agree that the 39th street median, a gateway to our neighborhood, is currently unlovely to behold. The median strip was dug up last fall so that a waterline could be replaced. When the job was completed, the median was reseeded by a subcontractor. That effort failed, and the median is barren and brown. Now TCNA is working with the City to find ways to improve the looks of the median. We hope to have a landscape architect study the area and make recommendations for landscaping that can be maintained with minimal effort. Since even minimal maintenance will carry a price tag, we are exploring options for obtaining financial assistance that would help pay for upkeep once a plan for improvement has been developed.

Fall 2010

39th Street and Canterbury Road

The Traffic Department has concluded that the volume of traffic through this intersection is not heavy enough to qualify for either a traffic signal or four-way stop signs. The department is exploring the feasibility of a traffic circle here and will have a proposal for TCNA’s Traffic Committee and Board of Directors

in May. The board will take no action on this proposal until it has been reviewed at the association’s general membership meeting in June. Meanwhile, several measures to calm traffic and improve pedestrian safety with signs and pavement lines are being tried. The aim is to balance safety and aesthetic considerations. This intersection is definitely still a work in progress.